English for law enforcement pdf


 

English for Law Enforcement takes students from an elementary (A2) level to a high for Law Enforcement - Unit 2 - Briefing Pages from Teacher's usaascvb.info English for Law Enforcement is designed to meet the English language needs of law enforcement personnel. This includes civilian and military police. The latest addition to the Campaign suite of titles, this course is designed to meet the needs of law enforcement.

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English For Law Enforcement Pdf

Навчально-методичний посібник «English for Law Enforcement» можна використовувати як на аудиторних заняттях, у групах, під час індивідуального . English for Law Enforcement Unit 2 Students Book - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. English for Law Enforcement. CAMPAIGN english for law enforcement - dokument [*.pdf] CharlieVocabulary Task 4 Complete the table. Use these words. slurred lost.

The police play a primary role in the investigation. They are responsible for interrogating suspects and witnesses, and they carry out arrests,… However, police scholars have criticized this popular understanding of the word police—that it refers to members of a public organization having the legal competence to maintain order and enforce the law—for two reasons. First, it defines police by their ends rather than by the specific means that they use to achieve their goals. Second, the variety of situations in which police are asked to intervene is much greater than law enforcement and order maintenance. There is now a consensus among researchers, based on a definition first proposed by American sociologist Egon Bittner, that the common feature among all the different agencies engaged in policing is the legal competence to enforce coercive, nonnegotiable measures to resolve problematic situations. Such situations are characterized by two features: their potential for harm and the need to solve them urgently before they develop that potential. Hence, the actual use of coercion or the threat of using it allows police to put a quick, nonnegotiated, and conclusive end to problematic situations e. The best known of these bodies are the public constabulary forces that patrol public spaces, often in marked cars, and whose members wear a uniform. They are the most visible representatives of the civil authority of government, and they provide the model typically associated with police organizations. However, in many Anglo-Saxon countries—such as Australia , Canada , the United Kingdom, and the United States—there are at least twice as many private security agents as public police officers. Furthermore, security and intelligence agencies that generally operate undercover have played an increasingly important role in combating terrorism , especially since the September 11 attacks in the United States in Policing has therefore become a complex undertaking that straddles the traditional institutional and jurisdictional distinctions between public and private, criminal and political.

They comply with the laws because they consider them fair and because they believe that in the long run it is in their interest to observe them.

In all societies this system of informal rewards and punishments is the most potent aid to law enforcement, but it is strongest in small communities. The forces that order life in a small community thus make the task of the police much easier. Police action is needed only when such informal controls have proved insufficient.

This is why rural and sparsely populated areas are often policed by a single centralized—and often militarized—police force, even in countries that have a decentralized police system.

A single police organization operating under a unified command is more cost-effective and more operationally efficient than a bevy of independent small-town police forces. Since the territory to cover may be very large and characterized by difficult terrain, police in such regions must have the long-range mobility and adaptability that are characteristic of military forces. In addition, the countryside has historically been policed by military organizations, as police forces were initially created in urban settings.

The great exceptions to this model are the United Kingdom and the United States, which have long resisted police centralization. Policing large societies In larger and more complex societies, informal institutions of social control are generally weaker, and, as a result, formal institutions are generally stronger. The relative weakness of informal controls is attributable to a number of factors. In large societies people often deal with strangers whom they will never meet again, and in such circumstances there may be fewer informal rewards for honesty or fewer informal penalties for dishonesty.

Such communities tend also to be more technologically advanced, which leads to the adoption of new laws, such as those regulating the licensing and operation of automobiles and those concerned with commerce conducted on the Internet see e-commerce. Because some of these new laws may not have the same moral significance as older laws criminalizing violence, theft, or fraud , people may feel less of an obligation to obey them. Moreover, when new laws are created, crime increases almost necessarily.

CEPOL | European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Training

There is thus a danger that people who are convicted of having violated a new law may feel aggrieved and in the future be less willing to cooperate with the police or to obey the law when they are not being observed. Finally, as societies grow, it becomes more difficult for people to place the public interest ahead of their private interests in circumstances where the two may conflict.

The desire for efficiency lends itself to the establishment of centralized police forces, which can take advantage of coordination and savings in training, organization, and service delivery. Look at the map and write what they are saying to Control. Then read the passage aloud to a partner. Positive I am driving along the motorway at the moment. Student A turn to File 5 on page Vehicle 1 Vehicle 2 Vehicle 3 Make and model: Licence plate number: Registered in: Registered to: Does it have any problems?

Use these words.

Tell your partner about the car you drive colour. It is. Task 3 What are the problems? Complete the sentences. The headlights. Conversation 1 1 Can I see your 2 Do you madam? Work in pairs and read your dialogues.

Complete the table. Student A turn to File 7 on page Student B turn to File 8 on page Find the information. Ask questions to complete your licences. If you take a taxi in Australia.

If you park in a non-stopping area. Student A look at this text about unusual driving laws. Task 7 Work in pairs. If you go to New York. By law. If you drive too fast. In this American state. It is illegal. Use a dictionary and be prepared to explain difficult words to your partner in English!

What do taxi drivers have to carry in Australia? Unusual driving laws of the world some parts of the world have unusual driving laws. All your passengers. Ask each other questions to complete your text.

Start Your Free Trial Today Police and society There is a remarkable historical, geographic, and organizational diversity in the activities of people who are, or have been, defined as police.

Police work has developed considerably from what it was centuries ago. As populations grew and informal institutions of socialization and social control—such as the family, schools, and the church—decreased in effectiveness, police became increasingly necessary.

English for Law Enforcement

However, no uniform worldwide system of policing ever emerged. Numerous factors help to explain the diversity of police activities and systems. For instance, if criminals use firearms, the police are likely to be armed, or if criminals use computers to commit crimes, the police may establish a special unit dedicated to investigating cybercrimes.

History also helps to explain this diversity; e. Population plays an important role as well; policing rural areas and villages vastly differs from policing large cities.

English for Law Enforcement Unit 2 Students Book

Policing small communities Most people willingly obey most laws, whether a police officer is present or not. They comply with the laws because they consider them fair and because they believe that in the long run it is in their interest to observe them.

In all societies this system of informal rewards and punishments is the most potent aid to law enforcement, but it is strongest in small communities. The forces that order life in a small community thus make the task of the police much easier. Police action is needed only when such informal controls have proved insufficient. This is why rural and sparsely populated areas are often policed by a single centralized—and often militarized—police force, even in countries that have a decentralized police system.

A single police organization operating under a unified command is more cost-effective and more operationally efficient than a bevy of independent small-town police forces.

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Since the territory to cover may be very large and characterized by difficult terrain, police in such regions must have the long-range mobility and adaptability that are characteristic of military forces. In addition, the countryside has historically been policed by military organizations, as police forces were initially created in urban settings. The great exceptions to this model are the United Kingdom and the United States, which have long resisted police centralization.

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