The Perfect Storm is a creative nonfiction book written by Sebastian Junger and published by W. W. Norton & Company in The paperback edition (ISBN. The Perfect Storm: A True Story Of Men Against The Sea: Sebastian Junger: Readers are first seduced into caring for the book's doomed characters, then. The Perfect Storm book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Takes readers into the maelstrom and shows nature's splendid.

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The Perfect Storm Book

*Starred Review* Junger's most recent book, War (), which recounts his experiences with combat troops in war-torn Afghanistan, embodies both his. The worst storm in history seen from the wheelhouse of a doomed fishing trawler; a mesmerisingly vivid account of a natural hell from a perspective that offers no. "There is nothing imaginary about Junger's book; it is all terrifyingly, awesomely real." —Los Angeles Times. It was the storm of the century, boasting waves over.

Rather, Junger, a freelance journalist, intends the phrase "perfect storm" to be read "in the meteorological sense: My God, thought Case, this is the perfect storm. And so it evidently proved for the six men aboard the Andrea Gail, a foot swordfish boat that disappeared off the coast of Nova Scotia on Oct. To dramatize the incredible fury of a severe storm at sea, Junger reconstructs the fatal voyage of the Andrea Gail. How does he manage to do this with no survivors to interview and with no details available about the ship's final hours of existence? A good deal is known up to a certain point: Junger nicely paces his narrative by interrupting it with histories of Gloucester, of the New England fishing industry and its gradual decline, and of the development of long-line fishing -- dragging a mile-long monofilament with up to 1, baited hooks. He creates a distinct atmosphere when he writes: They talk a lot about work; they talk about it the way men in prison talk about time.

The Perfect Storm Summary & Study Guide

He creates a distinct atmosphere when he writes: They talk a lot about work; they talk about it the way men in prison talk about time. Work is what's keeping them from going home, and they all want to go home. There's no sound but the smack of water on steel and the heavy gargle of the diesel engine. Perhaps most compelling of all, he explains in concrete detail why hurricanes blow, how waves rise, what happens to boats in a storm and the way human beings drown.

Thus he is able to reconstruct what he calls "the zero-moment point. What is particularly impressive here is the dedication of professional storm watchers to save any human life at sea, no matter what foolishness or bad luck led to the trouble.

Despite the upbeat ending of "The Perfect Storm," what lingers is a sense of the cruel indifference of nature. One chapter's epigraph quotes "Moby-Dick": Junger writes: But they didn't die, they disappeared off the face of the earth and, strictly speaking, it's just a matter of faith that these men will never return.

Such faith takes work, it takes effort. The people of Gloucester must willfully extract these men from their lives and banish them to another world. To have to strive for a belief in death and oblivion: Awe is all I can use to describe what this fine piece of Journalism offers. View 1 comment.

A Nor'easter forms when a tropical low meets a Canadian arctic blast, which intensifies the storm and creates a whopper whether in the North Atlantic, off the Northeast US coast, or inland. In late October, , a seasonal Nor'easter became even more powerful by picking up energy from disintegrating Hurricane Grace: Sebastian Junger's superlative telling of the real-life event, which resulted in this book and the movie "Perfect," of course, means perfectly disastrous.

Sebastian Junger's superlative telling of the real-life event, which resulted in this book and the movie starring George Clooney, reveals the storm in its horrific destruction -- also the mixed results of rescue efforts that come when governmental resources are stretched a little too far.

A True Story of Men Against the Sea goes into matters that the Clooney film simply couldn't spend much time on, such as the way a private pleasure boat apparently distracted rescue efforts from the fishing boat Andrea Gail, also the extent to which the profit motive endangered the Andrea Gail to a larger extent than was strictly necessary.

The Perfect Storm: Summary, Characters & Author

Another factor -- in the way of update -- was that the Loran system of ship identification was allowed to die a few years ago, to be replaced by GPS. It remains to be seen whether that budget-based decision was wise or not. What is indisputable is that this is a fine, gripping book, and should be read by those who have seen the movie as well as those who haven't. The "Andrea Gail" fishing boat: View all 3 comments. This book could easily sweep the floor with fictional thriller novels; to think that the events in it were true is really frightening!

But it's not really supposed to be scary. It's the story of brave men fighting to survive against a storm that engulfs them, and it's written vividly, with lots of emotion and featuring people who are very memorable after reading about them. It's really worth reading, I highly recommend it. Near the end of " Columbine", the author, Dave Cullen, mentioned that Mr. He said that the way Mr. I am glad that I did. What a read. I could not stop. I could not imagine this.

I have always felt that there is no force greater than a storming sea. This book solidifies my view that nothing can contain Mother Nature out upon the ocean.

I enjoyed this read as much as I knew the outcome, I kept reading. It was also a lesson in nautical history. A lesson in how our armed forces work hand in hand with these seafaring Americans. And to read that men still want nothing more than to spend months upon months on our dangerous oceans, willfully hoping that if a MAYDAY is sounded, someone will come to their rescue. They live on this hope. They have to. Reading of the many different rescues, was an eye opener. I found this book just an excellent read.

You can imagine the lives he enters. Men who want no possessions and nothing to hold them down. They live for the open seas. Men like that still exist. View all 9 comments.

Readers interested in the ocean, fishing, survival and rescue stories. It took me a little while to get into this book, but I'm really glad I did.

The last third was so powerful that I'm getting goosebumps writing this review. A Perfect Storm was packed full of information on the fishing industry, weather formation, and culture of fishing villages.

I was more interested in the tales of rescue, survival and loss, which the book also delivers on. The format of this book didn't match my initial expectations; it is not a single linear story, even though it seemed that w It took me a little while to get into this book, but I'm really glad I did. The format of this book didn't match my initial expectations; it is not a single linear story, even though it seemed that way at the beginning.

There are some technical and lengthy passages in the middle that made me wonder if I had the patience to read a historian's thesis on the fishing industry. Ummm, no. The answer is no. What was happening was not a terror beyond words. It was a grim sense of reality, a scrambling to figure out what to do next, a determination to stay alive and keep other people alive, and an awareness of the dark noisy slamming of the boat. Without revealing too much, I'll just say that some of the passages in the last part of the book will stay with me forever.

If you know any fishermen or women, give them a big hug.

Right now. Jan 04, Ana rated it it was amazing Shelves: I like Junger's writing style a lot. He's very poignant and manages to write in a both matter-of-factly and emotionally sensitive way at the same time.

This is the story he could piece together about one particular boat lost at sea, as well as what might have happened to its crew, during one of the worst storms ever recorded. He does this by combining very technical know-how about fishing and boats with an understanding of the psychology behind men's choices to go out at sea and how they deal wi I like Junger's writing style a lot.

He does this by combining very technical know-how about fishing and boats with an understanding of the psychology behind men's choices to go out at sea and how they deal with survival and death. It is an immensely interesting book for someone like me, who's curious about everything under the sun, but I'm guessing it's also valuable to someone who actually is a fisherman, because it's very adamant in offering correct information.

I totally recommend this. Such a fascinating and gut wrenching account of a storm that affected so many lives.

It starts out strong, gets a bit too technical in the middle, but finishes as a page turner with true accounts from others who survived the storm. All in all, a really great book. I thought this would be a pretty interesting book - I had vaguely heard the story when the movie came out, although I haven't seen the movie. The Perfect Storm is a great name for the book, as the book revolved around the storm that took out the Andrea Gail. It gave a lot of good information about fishing, but overall I wasn't impressed by the book, especially when it concerns the Andrea Gail.

The synopsis on the back of the book annoyed me, because I thought the book was going to be entirely abo I thought this would be a pretty interesting book - I had vaguely heard the story when the movie came out, although I haven't seen the movie. The synopsis on the back of the book annoyed me, because I thought the book was going to be entirely about the Andrea Gail, but it instead seemed to be about the storm itself, past storms, and other accidents that happened during the storm.

No one knows what happened on the boat - it was never found.

The author did make it clear that what he was writing was just a guess based on other boaters and their experiences, but it was pretty annoying to constantly read "Presumably" and "Probably.

One of my all time favorite reads. I love the ocean and stories about it. This one holds a bit of imagination into what may have happened out there at sea in a crazy storm. I really like this book and have read it multiple times. Since the Mayflower, my relatives were fisherman around Gloucester, making this book a fascinating read for me.

I remember my great grandfather talking about cod fishing on the Grand Banks and the storms that sank friends' boats. Not long after I read the book, I was staying in a bed and breakfast in the small town of Scituate down the Massachusettes coast, and the movie was playing in a tiny theater across the street, so I went.

When I came out, it was pitch black and a huge thunderstorm had co Since the Mayflower, my relatives were fisherman around Gloucester, making this book a fascinating read for me.

When I came out, it was pitch black and a huge thunderstorm had come ashore. How eerie! If you liked the book and visit Gloucester, it's much like it's been for decades; still a small fishing town, albeit a poorer one since most of the cod have been fished out. Gloucester was where the first schooners were made; I've got a picture of my great grandfather's two masted schooner. They raced them, especially against the schooners of Halifax. They usually won until when the Bluenose was built in Nova Scotia which reigned undefeated for 16 years.

Fascinating stuff! I had heard that this book was good but I thought it was sort of boring. I don't know anything about boating and I think you have to have some boating knowledge before reading this book. There are pages and pages of descriptions about what a swordfishing boat looks like, using words I had never even heard of! It would have been helpful if there was a diagram of the boat, just as there was a map of the Atlantic at the beginning of the book that was a great reference.

What I did like about the boo I had heard that this book was good but I thought it was sort of boring. What I did like about the book though was that it was journalistic non-fiction, as much as could be considering the author was guessing based on others' accounts what was happening as the boat was going down.

It also made me realize how scary being on the open sea must be in a storm. Oct 11, Vicki Willis rated it really liked it Shelves: The author did a good job capturing the feel of the fishing culture.

It was technical, but interesting how the science of the weather and the science of the fishing industry came together to make this perfect the book even defined perfect as something NOT good storm. I was enthralled the entire time, even though I knew how the story ended.

A great book for me. I absolutely hated this book. It's just over pages but it took me more than three weeks to force myself to complete it; I hated the author's style so much that whenever I could bring myself to read a few pages, I started looking for something to distract me. Beyond stylistic preferences, I had problems with its structure. First off, it was entirely written in the present tense, making it sound like a sports play-by-play commentary.

This is a very clumsy approach; the only thing worse is writi I absolutely hated this book. This is a very clumsy approach; the only thing worse is writing from a second person viewpoint, something that almost never works even in short form writing.

It's awkward. The author was also fond of extreme hyperbole, and contradicts himself frequently, such as as a loose paraphrase "When this type of condition meets that kind of front, then such and such happens. But that never happens. The worst occurance of this was when he contradicted his actual narrative, as on pp. Junger spent two paragraphs explaining that weather condition updates were channeled across three points ships, Suffolk AFB and McGuire AFB , but only if specifically asked for.

McGuire only communicated with Suffolk if Suffolk asked for updates.

‎The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men Against the Sea on Apple Books

Likewise, Suffolk only gave craft updates if they asked and Suffolk only asked McGuire if a pilot asked them for updates. Then he repeated it: The pilot called and Suffolk failed to ask McGuire for an update, or the pilot failed to ask Suffolk?

Finally, by the end of the book Junger turned the whole thing into a ghost story, complete with clairvoyance and spectral visitations by the dead crews.

He didn't report that some family members believed they saw ghosts, he gave this mumbo-jumbo credence by reporting the alleged incidents as factual events.

I have all due sympathy for the people who lost friends and family in that storm, and for the dead themselves, but it's pretty irresponsible to take what is ostensibly purported to be a historical account, sticking only to established, documented facts and then inserting woo crap like that.

Fine, Mr. Junger has won awards for his writing. Based on this I don't understand that, but I accept that. In spite of my problems with his prose, I certainly concede the overall importance of telling this story, that's why I persevered to the end. I just wish it had been told better, and I don't think I'll tackle any of his other books or articles.

This was pretty good and read really quickly, especially toward the end. The quite drawn-out description of what it's like to drown was terrifying, as well as the description of what the ocean is like in a storm like that. I'm scared of the ocean so I found it oddly fascinating in a horrific way. I also thought that the very real importance of dreams and premonitions was described in the book--crewmen would get a "bad feeling" about going out with a boat and family members would dream about love This was pretty good and read really quickly, especially toward the end.

I also thought that the very real importance of dreams and premonitions was described in the book--crewmen would get a "bad feeling" about going out with a boat and family members would dream about loved ones who were in peril or lost. Overall, there's something weird about reading something so gripping about something so tragic that's a real story--it feels exploitative to be that interested in how it all happened.

But the author does a nice job of respecting the family members and the memory of the people who died. I had mixed feelings about this book, but I would recommend it to just about anyone. But Junger was faced with a fundamental problem with this book that I'm not sure he was able to overcome satisfactorily: Ironically and oddly, he tells very detailed stories of survival and rescues during the same storm of characters who we don't get to know with the same level of intimacy as afforded those folks of the Andrea Gail.

So we get to know a lot about people who had an adventure we know little or nothing of, but get great detail of the adventures of people who we get to know little about. There seems to be a certain imbalance in that. Even so, this was a very good book; a solid read; and I love anything that smacks of truelife sea adventure and survival.

View all 4 comments. This is a review of the audio book which I downloaded for free from the Sync Audio summer reading program last summer.

If you haven't had a chance to use this program, go to http: Remember that movie with George Clooney and Mark Walhberg? This is the book that inspired that movie. While the book doesn't really have any sexy movie stars, it does pay homage to the fishermen and rescue workers alike. The Perfect Storm is the story of the Andrea Gale, a fishing bo This is a review of the audio book which I downloaded for free from the Sync Audio summer reading program last summer. The Perfect Storm is the story of the Andrea Gale, a fishing boat that set out in October and never returned.

At first I found the audio a little tedious. There's a lot of information on the fishery, about the boats, and the fishermen. Fishing is a difficult job - a lot of time away from home, isolated, and subject to nature's whims. I did enjoy the rescue aspect and at this point I appreciated all the details. My hat goes off to all the people who are trained in Maritime search and rescue. Highly recommended. In his high school years, Bobby played lacrosse. Before boarding the Andrea Gail, he lived above his favorite hang-out, The Crow's Nest, where his mother, Ethel, would tend the bar.

Chris soon became his fiance. Bobby had two children from a previous marriage. He accepted the spot on the Andrea Gail because he needed money to pay the child support that he owed his ex-wife. Bobby planned this fishing trip to be the last one before settling down and marrying Chris.

It was said that Bobby was not only the youngest fisherman on the boat, but the most inexperienced as well. Dale "Murph" Murphy: In the story Murph is 33 years old. He is from Bradenton Beach, Florida. He is physically described to have shaggy black hair, a thin beard, and Mongolian eyes. Murph has a three-year-old child and an ex-wife named Debra.

Murph is the cook for the Andrea Gail. David "Sully" Sullivan: A hired fisherman who served to replace a worker on the Andrea Gail who dropped out of the job.

Sully is well known in Gloucester for saving his entire crew on one fishing voyage. He creates a distinct atmosphere when he writes: "At dinner the crew talk about what men everywhere talk about -- women, lack of women, kids, sports, horse racing, money, lack of money, work. They talk a lot about work; they talk about it the way men in prison talk about time. Work is what's keeping them from going home, and they all want to go home.

There's no sound but the smack of water on steel and the heavy gargle of the diesel engine. Perhaps most compelling of all, he explains in concrete detail why hurricanes blow, how waves rise, what happens to boats in a storm and the way human beings drown.

Thus he is able to reconstruct what he calls "the zero-moment point.

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