Fallen Leaves by Will Durant - Praised as a “revelatory” book by The Wall Street Journal, this is the last and most personal work of Pulitzer Prize–winning. fallen-leaves-will-durant-pdf-free Fallen Leaves Will Durant Pdf Free Updated a year ago. About · 0 Discussions · 0 Change Requests. Star. Fallen Leaves: Last Words on Life, Love, War, and God. Praised as a “revelatory” book by The Wall Street Journal, this is the last and most personal work of Pulitzer Prize–winning author and historian Will Durant, discovered thirty-two years after his death. The culmination.

Author:KEISHA SPEICE
Language:English, Spanish, Arabic
Country:Costa Rica
Genre:Academic & Education
Pages:506
Published (Last):02.02.2016
ISBN:186-2-74825-430-9
Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
Uploaded by: KATHE

66586 downloads 86662 Views 28.79MB PDF Size Report


Fallen Leaves Will Durant Pdf

Praised as a “revelatory” book by The Wall Street Journal, this is the last and most personal work of Pulitzer Prize–winning author and historian Will Durant. Editorial Reviews. Review. "Fallen Leaves is in some ways a slight book. But it is also a Now on site Video: Will Durant and Ariel Durant: Fallen Leaves. Will Durant () was an award-winning American writer, historian, and Will Durant Author Will Durant Other () cover image of Fallen Leaves.

History Literary Criticism Sociology Nonfiction Praised as a "revelatory" book by The Wall Street Journal, this is the last and most personal work of Pulitzer Prize—winning author and historian Will Durant, discovered thirty-two years after his death. The culmination of Will Durant's sixty-plus years spent researching the philosophies, religions, arts, sciences, and civilizations from across the world, Fallen Leaves is the distilled wisdom of one of the world's greatest minds, a man with a renowned talent for rendering the insights of the past accessible. Over the course of Durant's career he received numerous letters from "curious readers who have challenged me to speak my mind on the timeless questions of human life and fate. In twenty-two short chapters, Durant addresses everything from youth and old age to religion, morals, sex, war, politics, and art. Fallen Leaves is "a thought-provoking array of opinions" Publishers Weekly , offering elegant prose, deep insights, and Durant's revealing conclusions about the perennial problems and greatest joys we face as a species. In Durant's singular voice, here is a message of insight for everyone who has ever sought meaning in life or the counsel of a learned friend while navigating life's journey.

They also bring an unabashedly moral framework to their accounts, constantly stressing the repetition of the "dominance of strong over the weak, the clever over the simple". The Story of Civilization is the most successful historiographical series in history. It has been said that the series "put Simon and Schuster on the map" as a publishing house. An unabridged audiobook production of all 11 volumes was produced by Books On Tape Inc. The Story of Civilization is also noteworthy because of the excellence of its writing style, and contains numerous adages worthy of the Roman and Renaissance authors Durant admired.

Discussing certain inconsistencies in the character of Botticelli in The Renaissance page , he writes: In this was followed by one of the two highest awards granted by the United States government to civilians, the Presidential Medal of Freedom , awarded by President Ford.

The first volume of The Story of Civilization series is called Our Oriental Heritage and it is divided into an introduction and three books. The introduction takes the reader through the different aspects of civilization Economical, political, moral and mental.

Book two is " India and Her Neighbors". Book three moves deeper into the east, where the Chinese Civilization flourishes and where Japan starts to find its place in the world's political map.

Christian Richard about starting "a movement, to raise moral standards.

Throughout his career, Durant made several speeches, including "Persia in the History of Civilization" that was presented as an address before the Iran-America Society in Tehran , Iran , on April 21, , and had been intended for inclusion in the Bulletin of the Asia Institute formerly Bulletin of the American Institute for Persian , then Iranian, Art and Archaeology , Vol.

VII, no. Though Ariel and Will had intended to carry the work on The Story of Civilisation into the 20th century, they simply ran out of time and expected the 10th volume to be their last. However, they went on to publish a final volume, their 11th, The Age of Napoleon in They also left behind notes for a twelfth volume, The Age of Darwin , and an outline for a thirteenth, The Age of Einstein , which would have taken The Story of Civilization through to The Durants also shared a love story as remarkable as their scholarship; they detail this in Dual Autobiography.

Fallen Leaves

After Will went into the hospital, Ariel stopped eating. Will died after he heard that Ariel had died. They died within two weeks of each other in she on October 25 and he on November 7.

Though their daughter, Ethel, and grandchildren strove to keep the death of his Ariel from the ailing Will, he learned of it on the evening news, and he himself died at the age of In , he published Tragedy of Russia: A few years after the books were published, social commentator Will Rogers had read them and described a symposium he had attended that included Will Durant as one of the contributors.

He later wrote of Durant, "He is just about our best writer on Russia. He is the most fearless writer that has been there. He tells you just what it's like.

He makes a mighty fine talk. One of the most interesting lecturers we have, and a fine fellow. Will Durant fought for equal wages, women's suffrage and fairer working conditions for the American labor force. Durant not only wrote on many topics but also put his ideas into effect. Durant, it has been said widely, attempted to bring philosophy to the common man.

He also wrote magazine articles. He was trying to improve understanding of viewpoints of human beings and to have others forgive foibles and human waywardness. He chided the comfortable insularity of what is now known as Eurocentrism , by pointing out in Our Oriental Heritage that Europe was only "a jagged promontory of Asia".

The result is the book you are holding in your hands—the final unpublished work of Will Durant. It is, at least in one respect, an ideal tome, as who among us has at one time or another not wished to seek the counsel of one wiser than ourselves? And who better to ask advice from about our most pressing concerns and social issues than a man who not only had lived long enough to have passed through all of the various hazardous straits of life, but who also was renowned for his broad erudition and knowledge of virtually all cultures and civilizations, and who had traveled the world several times over to better understand the ways of human behavior?

Gauging from the chapters, which were uncharacteristically all dated in Dr. And, as he referenced the work in newspaper interviews well into the late s, it appears that Durant had continued to work on the book for over a decade. The concept had been for Durant to present his views on various social, religious, and political issues this he did by revisiting and revising certain of his earlier and lesser-known writings on certain subjects and crafting entirely new material for others and then to branch off into a survey of modern twentieth-century literature and philosophy.

He had even completed one chapter into the second part of this enterprise when evidently he felt uncomfortable making such pronouncements without Ariel accompanying him. At this point, he involved her in the project and the second half of the book became so detailed and weighty that it became a book unto itself—and was published as such in under the title Interpretations of Life.

After the publication of Interpretations of Life, Durant returned to work on Fallen Leaves and would continue to do so until his death on November 7, Fallen Leaves, however, remained his pet project.

That Durant had managed to do so for over forty years is quite a wonder in itself.

As he mentions in his preface, he had over the years received letters from "curious readers who have challenged me to speak my mind on the timeless questions of human life and fate" italics mine —and he responded to their challenge with Fallen Leaves, spilling forth his views on such a wide range of topics—from sex to war, to the stages of life, to our minds and souls, to major social issues such as racism, the then ongoing war in Vietnam, the welfare state, and the problems and glories of both art and science.

Indeed, it is precisely because this is true that the observations he makes in Fallen Leaves are so resonant. They are the received wisdom of a man steeped in millennia of history, of which he was always aware that he was but a segment of its totality a drop of water attempting to analyze the sea, as he once said.

Here, then, for posterity is the lost and almost never known and final manuscript of Will Durant. It contains strong opinions, elegant prose, and deep insights into the human condition, born of a lifetime of study of different cultures, arts, sciences, and human history—as only Will Durant could write it.

To discover the last manuscript of a Pulitzer Prize—winning author such as Will Durant over thirty years after his passing is surely a major literary event, not only to fans of history and philosophy but to those who treasure dazzling and compelling prose. To such people, this book will surely have been worth the wait. Here I am, going on ninety-five; by this time I should have learned the art of silence, and should realize that every educated reader has already heard all opinions and their opposites; yet here I set out, fearful and rash, to tell the world—or one hundred millionth of it—just what I think on everything.

It is all the more ridiculous since, at my age, a man is deeply rooted in the ways or views of his youth, and is almost constitutionally incapable of understanding the changing world that assails him, and from which he tends to flee into the grooves of the past or the safety of his home.

Above all, a militant defense of education as the only true means of liberation w 4.

Fallen Leaves: Last Words on Life, Love, War, and God by Will Durant

I am quite partial to books written in this vein of old school confidence and calmness - it's very clear a master wrote this book. Underlined passages from this book. Jan 26, Kellog Mcpussy added it. What a delightful read! Durant writes lyrically and beautifully.

Through his writing, he seduces you to drop your guard, as I did when I read what he had to say on religion. Despite being a nonbeliever, I was quite intrigued by his outline for a non-divisive religious fellowship; should such a thing come to fruition, I would not mind being a member. Certain views can appear quite dated or idealistic especially his views on women, loosening morals and the role of education , but by and large it i What a delightful read!

Certain views can appear quite dated or idealistic especially his views on women, loosening morals and the role of education , but by and large it is a thoroughly enjoyable and edifying read. Feb 07, Manasa rated it really liked it.

Style meets substance in this collection of essays on everything from politics to art, distilled through a historian's lens.

For me the charm of this book lay not so much in the ideas as in how they were expressed; Durant's way with words gives new life to timeworn thoughts as well as eloquent twists on prevailing truisms. Among my favorites is his take on the past that lives, even more than the present. To be sure, at times the language seemed to obfuscate rather than enhance the message, but o Style meets substance in this collection of essays on everything from politics to art, distilled through a historian's lens.

To be sure, at times the language seemed to obfuscate rather than enhance the message, but on the whole this was a very rewarding read. Mar 03, Paul rated it it was amazing.

FALLEN LEAVES: LAST WORDS ON LIFE, LOVE, WAR, AND GOD By Will Durant

The distilled wisdom of one of the wisest men of the 20th Century on all the important subjects. What more could you want? He defines "wisdom" as "an application of experience to present problems, a view of the past in the light of the whole, a perspective of the moment in the vista of years past and years to come" p.

No one had a better perspective of the years past than Will Durant, who chronicled them from the beginnings of civilization to the mid 19th Century and saw most of the 20th The distilled wisdom of one of the wisest men of the 20th Century on all the important subjects. No one had a better perspective of the years past than Will Durant, who chronicled them from the beginnings of civilization to the mid 19th Century and saw most of the 20th Century.

Childhood may be defined as the age of play; therefore some children are never young, and some adults are never old. Will Durant, Fallen Leaves. Was a little disappointed based on my very high expectations based on how many hours I spent with Will Durant reading my way through, "The Story of Civilization".

His memoir seemed dated and a little stale. Nov 28, Yasir Malik rated it really liked it. Some excellent thoughts on issues we all face, war, death, life etc.

Do not agree with all his views and find them a but inappropriate in this day especially with regards to women. Still would recommend to read and pick up some gems. Style is a bit difficult to read. Dec 08, Jackie Smith rated it really liked it.

This is really interesting. I agree with much of Durant's thoughts especially on education and government, sadly they are much too utopian and sensible to ever be the reality.

His thoughts on women are somewhat outdated to my mind, but all in all well worth reading. Sep 10, Brian Eshleman rated it really liked it. Bandages to convey serious thoughts without taking himself too seriously. He has a gift for the pithy phrase which is still penetrating in its insight. I am baffled have someone so smart and generally open minded can be so closed to the Gospel. Dec 11, Kaye rated it it was amazing Shelves: A superb little book, written late in Durant's life and thought lost until recently.

It consists of small essays on various topics that interested Durant, and us all, throughout his life, youth, middle age, old age, death, religion, morality, etc. A very good read. May 16, Bita Jam rated it liked it. Whether it is really written by great Will Durant or not, i liked it. Some issues were not related to our time specially when it came to women. There were some very fantastic sentenced which I loved in other chapters. Will Durant is a drop of water trying to analyze the sea.

A collection of his thoughts on life, Love, War and God. I am and always will be in awe of his knowledge and the eloquence with which he wrote his thoughts.

Mar 11, Zeenat Mahal rated it it was ok. Ramblings of a well read man but nothing worth spending money and time on! Jan 09, Andrea Engle rated it liked it Shelves: Eclectic, but very dated Wonderful commentary on all aspects of life.

Though you may not agree to some his solutions, his analysis as to the root of our societal problems cannot be faulted.

Great book. Feb 15, Nicole Marble rated it really liked it. A fascinating look at the 's, among other things. Mar 21, Sarah rated it really liked it. Some of it was great, as expected, occasionally I was a little disappointed at some of his thinking, but it was written 30 years ago so Mostly this guy is a genius. Jan 13, Lyle West rated it liked it.

Thought provoking, nicely written, insightful, but I find myself disagreeing with the writer. It is also interesting to see how much world events have changed the outlook in 40 years. Nov 13, Michael Logan added it.

Is this real? I mean seriously! Would they lie and say it's a Durant book just to sell it?

View all 3 comments. Jun 28, Kate rated it did not like it Shelves: Allow me to recap my internal dialogue about this book for you. I dunno, I feel like I should try to finish this. Are you kidding? That's not-- Me2: OK, that is accurate. Your reactions range from "yawn," at best, to "blind rage.

Well, every so often he has a good line! Name one. Just -- Me2: Give me a second! I just need to look-- Me2: This one was good: And that's only the first clause of the sentence, the second clause annoyed you. Shut up. I gave you an example. That one line is buried in pages of solipsism. Well, you're not wrong. Like, that entire chapter on middle age-- Me2: Does Matthew Weiner owe Durant's estate a check? And the introduction warned us about his "paternalism" towards women, but jeez louise.